Test Strategy and Test Plan

Test Strategy
A Test Strategy document is a high level document and normally developed by project manager. This document defines “Software Testing Approach” to achieve testing objectives. The Test Strategy is normally derived from the Business Requirement Specification document.

The Test Strategy document is a static document meaning that it is not updated too often. It sets the standards for testing processes and activities and other documents such as the Test Plan draws its contents from those standards set in the Test Strategy Document.

Some companies include the “Test Approach” or “Strategy” inside the Test Plan, which is fine and it is usually the case for small projects. However, for larger projects, there is one Test Strategy document and different number of Test Plans for each phase or level of testing.

Components of the Test Strategy document

  • Scope and Objectives
  • Business issues
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Communication and status reporting
  • Test deliverability
  • Industry standards to follow
  • Test automation and tools
  • Testing measurements and metrices
  • Risks and mitigation
  • Defect reporting and tracking
  • Change and configuration management
  • Training plan

Test Plan
The Test Plan document on the other hand, is derived from the Product Description, Software Requirement Specification SRS, or Use Case Documents.
The Test Plan document is usually prepared by the Test Lead or Test Manager and the focus of the document is to describe what to test, how to test, when to test and who will do what test.

It is not uncommon to have one Master Test Plan which is a common document for the test phases and each test phase have their own Test Plan documents.

There is much debate, as to whether the Test Plan document should also be a static document like the Test Strategy document mentioned above or should it be updated every often to reflect changes according to the direction of the project and activities.
My own personal view is that when a testing phase starts and the Test Manager is “controlling” the activities, the test plan should be updated to reflect any deviation from the original plan. After all, Planning and Control are continuous activities in the formal test process.

  • Test Plan id
  • Introduction
  • Test items
  • Features to be tested
  • Features not to be tested
  • Test techniques
  • Testing tasks
  • Suspension criteria
  • Features pass or fail criteria
  • Test environment (Entry criteria, Exit criteria)
  • Test deliverables
  • Staff and training needs
  • Responsibilities
  • Schedule

This is a standard approach to prepare test plan and test strategy documents, but things can vary company-to-company

40 Comments
  1. shubhangee
    July 13, 2011 | Reply
  2. Rahul Upadhyay
    July 14, 2011 | Reply
  3. RaHul Tiwari
    July 18, 2011 | Reply
  4. July 19, 2011 | Reply
  5. Joseph
    August 2, 2011 | Reply
  6. Ramesh Reddy
    August 8, 2011 | Reply
  7. Leo
    September 6, 2011 | Reply
  8. arun
    October 11, 2011 | Reply
  9. vipin
    October 17, 2011 | Reply
  10. venkat
    November 27, 2011 | Reply
  11. Porush
    January 27, 2012 | Reply
  12. sampsos
    February 6, 2012 | Reply
  13. nagaswathi
    March 2, 2012 | Reply
  14. March 11, 2012 | Reply
  15. siddu
    March 28, 2012 | Reply
  16. lokesh
    March 28, 2012 | Reply
  17. thenmozhi
    April 3, 2012 | Reply
  18. Prateek
    April 12, 2012 | Reply
  19. Ravi`
    July 30, 2012 | Reply
  20. syed
    September 13, 2012 | Reply
  21. saketha
    October 5, 2012 | Reply
  22. Sam
    October 5, 2012 | Reply
  23. October 9, 2012 | Reply
  24. shaik nagulmeera
    January 2, 2013 | Reply
  25. Ravi Suvvari
    January 10, 2013 | Reply
  26. Nisha
    February 21, 2013 | Reply
  27. Shri
    March 12, 2013 | Reply
  28. June 10, 2013 | Reply
  29. Anju
    July 3, 2013 | Reply
  30. Sultana
    July 27, 2013 | Reply
  31. Pradeep
    August 5, 2013 | Reply
  32. August 5, 2013 | Reply
  33. komal
    October 7, 2013 | Reply
  34. SHussain
    January 3, 2014 | Reply
  35. February 12, 2014 | Reply
  36. pravash
    February 15, 2014 | Reply
  37. Sherine
    March 25, 2014 | Reply
  38. Prasad
    April 26, 2014 | Reply
  39. Ganesh
    May 5, 2014 | Reply
  40. Santosh Sheelvant
    June 5, 2014 | Reply

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


− 3 = three